Posts Tagged: WTF

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I will not negotiate with terrorists.

ohdeargodbees:

This has nothing to do with games and is not a matter of legitimate public interest, but is simply a personal matter. I would hope and request that the games press be respectful of what IS a personal matter, and not news, and not about games. This is explicitly about my private life, which has…

I wish you could read the rest of that, but it has been erased.
(actually, it’s back up)

Yes, shortly after Zoe responded to a (lengthy) personal attack piece that’s been circulating for a few days, gamer dudes fed up with her insistence that her private life was her own decided to hack her tumblr, post her personal information (phone numbers, addresses, even relatives’ contact information) along with calling her disgusting slurs. They even posted the submission email address for her tumblr, which meant in-between the hate there were pleas to leave her alone, along with posts that insisted she was behind the entire harassment campaign in the first place and this was all an elaborate plea for sympathy.

It is easier for the internet to believe a woman is capable crafting her own hate campaign than it is to sit back and accept that the online “community” of video game enthusiasts has serious problems with women.

Because this keeps happening. Over and over again.
And I don’t know what can be done.

I don’t want to list all the women just in 2014 who have endured repeated online abuse, because part of what gets these dudes off is the notion that women are “playing the victim card.” Well guys, I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but you keep creating female victims. Or did they all engineer their own harassment?

And puh-leez don’t come back here with talk of how this is really about “SJW hypocrisy” or “video game ethics.” If the internet wanted to tear a game developer a new asshole because their game wasn’t up to snuff, the internet can and does do that. But only when there’s a woman involved does the internet violate her privacy and use gendered, sexist insults.

Besides, if you read what these guys are writing, it has nothing to do with her work and everything to do with who she (allegedly) slept with. And that is the definition of “none of our business.” Besides, any and all “ethics” defenses are erased when you make clever nicknames based on her (alleged) sexual habits. You don’t get to call a woman a “slut” and pretend your anger is unconnected to her being a woman. I don’t see any hacking or doxxing of the men she “used” to promote her work. Shouldn’t they be equally culpable in this fantasy scandal you’ve constructed?

It’s been said before and you’re not listening to me anyway, but no one is taking your video games away. When Zoe releases a game it doesn’t cancel out a big-budget shooter. When a woman criticizes video games, she doesn’t put a wall between you and your pre-order. And when women point out that they are being ignored and marginalized by video game companies, those companies really, really don’t need you to defend them. Microsoft’s feelings can’t be hurt. EA doesn’t lose sleep.

The only people hurt in these scenarios are the women who speak out about their situation. The internet is very quick to react to cries of sexism with…sexist remarks.

Because this keeps happening. Over and over again.
And I don’t know what can be done.

Source: ohdeargodbees
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  • Question: There's a small town in France whose name literally means "Death to Jews" (La-mort-aux-Juifs) and residents don't want to change the name because "the name has been around since the middle ages and nobody here is really anti-semitic anyways". - Anonymous
  • Answer:

    yoisthisracist:

    I feel like it might be hard to know for sure whether you’re anti-Semitic or not if you’ve made it impossible to ever have a normal interaction with a Jewish person.

    you know what would get them to change their name? Threaten to build a Jewish Community Center there.

Source: yoisthisracist
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  • Question: I've seen the way you reply some people's questions, so I'm not expecting anything nice, but I do have a serious question I would like you to answer. I know the n-word comes from what slavers called black people, right? But, even now, hundreds of years of slavery being abolished, some black people still don't like whites calling them the n-word, so, isn't that kind of antagonizing races? Given the case that the white guy calling the n word a black guy is his friend, obviously. - Anonymous
  • Answer:

    yoisthisracist:

    "Why isn’t being hurt by a racial slur just as bad as being racist???" - your stupid ass.

    shocking news for anon: I don’t call black people racial slurs. I don’t want to call them racial slurs, and I doubt they want me to call them racial slurs.

    this does not antagonize me.

Source: yoisthisracist
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  • Question: As I'm sure you know there's a big drought in SoCal.Well I'm very clearly Native American, and have been asked to do a rain dance about a billion times so far, by everyone from acquaintances to Starbucks employees. I don't wish harm on people, but IF it comes to it, I hope they die of dehydration first. - Anonymous
  • Answer:

    yoisthisracist:

    That’s mad fair dogg.

Source: yoisthisracist
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  • Question: Last christmas, my sister's new boyfriend started talking about how American slavery ended much faster than other cultures, historically, and how he wished that was something the school systems taught, along with the other positive aspects of slavery. I had to leave the room to avoid throwing things, and now I'm the asshole. - Anonymous
  • Answer:

    yoisthisracist:

    Don’t let your racist family tell you whose the asshole, it’s them. It’s always them.

    "positive aspects of slavery" is tied with "Hitler had some good ideas" on the list of Phrases That End Conversations And Friendships

Source: yoisthisracist
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it’s pouring rain tonight and I watched The Black Hole for the first time since my childhood. It’s a movie that deserves to be seen and remembered, even if some aspects are forgettable.

I was too young to notice trends at the time, but once Star Wars became a hit, every studio in Hollywood must have wanted their own glitzy science-fiction picture to attract that audience. Someone at Disney must have wanted that money so bad they greenlit this: a surreal, bleak, barely-family-friendly space opera.

Listen to that theme song (by John Barry of James Bond fame)! This is no roaring adventure, it’s a descent into madness. As a child I’m sure I was hooked by all the robots and eventual laser blasters but watching it as a grownup, the entire film gives off an Event Horizon vibe. Indeed, I think one could write a compelling essay putting those two films in the same universe.

The Black Hole isn’t a great movie. Despite being a brief ninety minutes, the movie takes a long time to get started and the characters on-screen seem to be the last ones to realize that the obvious villain of the film is going to kill them. And that villain’s exact intentions are never really made clear: he wants to go through the black hole, but was he waiting for someone to find him first? Was he always going to kill his guests, or did he decide to do that only when they finally figured out he was chaotic insane?

There’s also the matter of the nonsensical science in this science-fiction movie. I don’t demand realism at all times but I’m old-fashioned enough to want some semblance of rational physics. Yet multiple characters seem to survive the vacuum of space in The Black Hole because…someone catches them? They have a firm grip?

Regardless, it’s worth watching because it’s such a strange creation. The evil robot, Maximillian (seen above) is cool. The Cygnus, the giant ship where the villain lives, is cool. And when they finally go into the black hole…I won’t give it away, but it was the last thing I expected.

The bad news is that Disney seems to have forgotten (or lost interest) in this movie. No Blu-Ray exists as far as I can tell, and the DVDs are from a decade ago. I’m not sure it even came out on DVD in Japan at all and Japan loves everything Disney touches.

But I recommend you seek it out. Don’t break the bank, don’t sacrifice too much, but give it a look. For years, The Black Hole lingered inside my head like a nightmare, as nothing but images minus all context. Now that I’ve seen it as a grown-up, I can rest easier knowing that it’s not cinematic buried treasure but I’m glad I dug it up all the same.

I’m going to dream about this movie, aren’t I? Be kind, brain.

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this just happened. all at once.

my apologies to my eleven new, like-minded followers: I will disappoint you

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forcemajeureart:

Commedia dell’arte


the new season of Doctor Who is looking up

forcemajeureart:

Commedia dell’arte

the new season of Doctor Who is looking up

(via kaesespaetzle)

Source: forcemajeureart
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fucknovideogames:

Yesterday, Grinding Gear Games posted a teaser detailing planned UI changes for their free-to-play RPG Path of Exile. In the current version of the game, the Health and Mana orbs on either side of the screen are framed by statues of chained, partially-clothed women; in the planned update, these statues would be replaced by unobtrusive reclining figures, inspired by classical sculpture. 

Sounds good, right? The forums didn’t seem to think so. After thirty-nine pages riddled with complaints about the new statues (often casually sexist or homophobic), the developers posted a new screenshot. The chained women are back.

The old statues have been restored. We still intend to remove them in favour of ones that cover less of the health/mana orbs, but have moved this to a longer-term change. The new statues will have a classical Roman look that better fits with long term stylistic goals.

When the mods were asked about the logic behind the revision:

We changed it away from the new statues because we agreed with some of the feedback. We’re trying to be very clear that they’re going to change again in the future.

We listen to all our players. The forum only represents a small fraction of total players, but the feedback is absolutely taken on board. Having said that, some peoples’ behaviour in that thread was terrible.

It’s sad to see a community push back so hard against a minor change - particularly one that would dial back gratuitous sexualization, and make some players feel more comfortable. It’s possible that Grinding Gear Games will follow through in later updates, but given that the prevailing argument was simply "I preferred the slave girls", this sets a discouraging precedent.

This story is based on a tip from one of our readers! If there’s an issue you think FNVG should cover, you can find our contact information on the About page.

christ, the “slave girls” take up a tiny corner of the screen, who needs them there at all? who would get ANGRY about a few shifted pixels in the corner of the UI to the point of throwing a temper tantrum? And why would the developers fold?

Source: fucknovideogames
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"Questions about violent entertainment gained new urgency in May, when Elliot O. Rodger, 22, killed himself and six others in Isla Vista, Calif., after writing a manifesto, “My Twisted World,” in which, among other things, he portrayed himself as having been immersed in “Halo,” the shooter game."

-

this quote is from a bizarre New York Times article on Comic Con and, I’m sorry, I must have missed something: has the conversation surrounding Eliot Rodger really skipped past gun laws and rape culture and gone straight to VIDEO GAMES?

how the fuck does that work? how do you ignore a man’s public rage and contempt for women only to decide “clearly the culprit in this crime was Halo.”

is misogyny so acceptable in America that the media will bend over backwards to find a different motivation for murder, no matter how illogical?

I am not here to dismiss any arguments over violence in media (I’m concerned about it myself) but that concern comes from an artistic viewpoint. I’d like to see more media, particularly video games, explore stories that don’t involve non-stop killing, because I want to see fresh ideas. And sure, I’m disappointed that violence is so celebrated in games. But Jesus CHRIST how do you draw a line from cosplayers at Comic Con to mass murderers?

Comic books, movies, video games, and combinations of all three of those things (synergy!) are big business. BIG business. This stuff is popular all around the world. It has been for decades. If there was a direct causality between media violence and real violence, we’d be hip-deep in imitation murders by now, and by “us” I mean the entire world.

You want to talk about media and Eliot Rodger, how about we talk about sexism in the media? Like the fact that women in media are typically there to serve as a MacGuffin for the hero to rescue? Like the fact that media tells men - particularly young men - that having sex with a woman is their reward for being “nice”?

But sure, three cherry-picked white men from a sickening number of shootings in the United States played video games, so let’s study violent entertainment more.